Thursday, June 28, 2012

Little "Peanut"

Hello again... it's been a while since my last tutorial, but I'm sure you're ready for another one... :0)))

This tutorial is not about bears, but a little mouse made from plymer clay. His name is Peanut!!!


I made him specially to be a companion to my latest pattern called Marley. Take a look:
To make little Peanut you’ll need some Sculpey III modelling clay (or any other polymer clay of your choice) in caramel, white and black colours… and maybe a little pink. You’ll also need a sharp knife with a pointy edge, a metal or bamboo skewer and a thin brush with a round wooden top. This clay sets hard once baked in a household oven at low temperature (check instructions on the packet for directions on how to bake it).

Cut some brown clay and half that amount of white clay. Wrap the left over in a seal tight container or re-sealable bag. (This will keep the clay from drying and going brittle). Knead the two colours of clay till mixed and soft
Roll it into a ball, then into a log. Cut a few segment from it, 2 large for the body and head, and then some smaller ones for the feet, arms, ears and tail.
Pick two of the smaller pieces of clay and roll it into a ball, then roll one end into a cone. Do the same with the other piece. Place them side by side (as shown below) and make some toes marks on each one.

Now pick one of the large pieces of clay and roll it into a ball, then roll one end into a cone. Place this cone onto the feet till they hold together.

Knead a small amount of white clay into a ball and then into a cone

Flatten in and attach it to the front of the body, smoothing out all edges till it looks like it’s part of the body

Pick another one of the smaller segments and roll it into a thin sausage

With the help of a metal needle, knife or something sharp, make an indentation right in the middle of the sausage, but don’t cut all the way through

Place each end of the sausage around the shoulder area, and press to hold in place.
Make a mark with a knife around the inner elbow area

Pick the other large piece of clay and roll it into a ball and then into a cone

With the round end of the brush make an oval indentation on either side of the face (eye sockets).

Cut 2 small pieces of white clay, roll them into oval shapes. Place each one into the eye sockets.

Then press them into shape with the help of the brush round wooden end (see picture below).

With the help of the sharp end of a knife, make a hole at the front bottom of the face

Pick up a very small amount of white clay, roll it into a ball and flatten it alittle. Mark a line right in the middle as shown below

Place these ‘teeth inside the hole you’ve just made on the head. Press the mouth a little to close and hold onto the teeth.
Pick up another 2 segments of brown clay and 2 smaller ones of white (or pink) clay. Roll them into balls (the photo below will show you how big these segments are compared to the size of the head, but these ears can be made slightly smaller, so don’t worry too much about the size of these)

Flatten each piece into a pancake and place the white (or pink) clay onto the brown clay Press to hold in place.

With the help of the round end of a brush, wrap each ear around it to give the ear some shape.

Place each ear on either side of the head and smooth edges with your fingers

Make a hole at the top of the body and bottom of the head with s needle or bamboo skewer.
Cut a toothpick in half, insert one end at the bottom of the head and the other end into the top of the body. This will help the head to stay in place while baking.

Pick up another small segment of brown clay and roll it into a long thin sausage

Place one end under the body’s back of this mouse. Press to hold.

Wrap or bend tail towards the body to give it movement.

Pick up a small amount of black clay. Roll it into a ball and then into a fine sausage. Cut 2 very tiny pieces and one large piece from it (eyes and nose).
Make the 2 smaller ones into balls and place each one at the top of the white of the eyes. Press them with your finger tip to spread slightly into place. With the larger ball make it into an oval shape and place it at the tip of the muzzle to make the nose.

Push the teeth forward slightly (if it needs to, so the look ok).

… and there you have it. Bake for 30 minutes at the recommended temperature (read instructions on the clay’s wrap).
Once baked you can leave Peanut as he is, or you can glaze the nose and eyes with some sculpt glossy varnish.

10 comments:

  1. He is as cute as a button.
    How could a little Ellie be frightened of that????
    Hugs

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  2. Little mouse baby:) So cute and adorable!

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  3. Thank you again for your wonderful instructions

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  4. You are a wonder, Mon - and a constant inspiration. Thanks again for the generous way you share your talents with us.
    Hugs, Kayzy

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  5. glad to know their difference in scale, thanks for sharing.

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  6. EXCELLENT tutorial, loe the simplicity. Gorgeous creations.
    E-M-Bears

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  7. It is so cute. You reminded me of the times when I am always scolded by mom for sleeping late at night as I am very busy playing clay. The activity keeps me awake late at night especially when I am eager enough to finish certain form and will not be satisfied if not perfectly done.

    http://online-phd-uk.co.uk/

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